Best Yardsticks to value stocks for investment

I always look at PE value and PBV value with Return on Capital Employed ratio for my investment and I also used to compare these value for stocks in the same industry But I was using the same across different sectors and used to wonder why some set of stocks which had similar values had a huge difference in prices. one thing I used to think was the potential of growth. Money Today article explains this how to value stocks and what information in annual, quarterly results drive the increase or decrease in stock prices.  Thanks Money Today and copied here for my future investment reference.

Industry
Best Yardsticks to Value Stocks
Auto Price to Earnings (PE) multiple
Banking PE and Price to Book Value (PBV) or Adjusted PBV multiple
Cement PE, Enterprise Value to Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation & amortisation (EV/EBITDA), EV/tonne
Engineering Forward PE, which reflects the order book position of the company
FMCG PE, Return on Equity (RoE) and Return on Capital Employed (RoCE) ratios
Real Estate Net asset value (NAV), which is book value at market prices. Also look at debt levels
Telecom PE and DCF, because there is a future stream of cash flows for upfront heavy investment
Oil & Gas Residual reserves of energy assets
Technology Trailing PE and its growth

 

Industry
What Impacts Stock Valuations
Auto Volume growth, realisations, operating profit margins, new product launches
Banking Loan growth, non-performing assets, net interest margins, CASA ratio
Cement Dispatches, operating costs, regional demand supply equation
Engineering Order book inflows, execution skills, margins
FMCG RoE, RoCE, margins, volume growth, new products, market share
Real Estate Debt levels, liquid assets, inventory levels, promoters’ ability to raise funds
Telecom Revenue per user, growth in usage, new subscribers, non-wireless revenues, EBITDA
Oil & Gas Reserves, efficiency ratios, free cash flow generation
Technology Order inflow, ability to contain costs, service verticals, profitability, client attrition