Effective praise

1. Be specific. Vague praise doesn’t make much of an impression.

2. Find a way to praise sincerely and realistically. It’s a rare situation where you can’t identify something that you honestly find praiseworthy.

3. Never offer praise and ask for a favor in the same conversation. It makes the praise seem like a set-up.

4. Look for something less obvious to praise – a more obscure accomplishment or quality that a person hasn’t heard praised many times before.

5. Don’t hesitate to praise people who get a lot of praise already. I’ve noticed that even people who get constant praise – or perhaps especially people who get constant praise – crave praise. Is this because praiseworthy people are often insecure? Or does getting praise lead to a need for more praise? I’m not sure, but it seems often to be the case.

6. Praise people behind their backs. The praised person usually hears about the praise, and behind-the-back praise seems more sincere than face-to-face praise.

7. Beware when a person asks for your honest opinion. This is often a clue that they’re seeking reassurance, not candor.